The Times of India BMD Announcements 1920

clip_image002The Families in British India Society has just put online Births, Marriage & Death announcements from The Times of India newspaper for the year 1920. The members of this society work very hard to bring to the web an amazing array of material concerning families who lived in India.

Karachi 1866

Many of us will have ancestors who spent time in India and the FBIS website should be your first port of call if you think that some of your family may have travel to Indian subcontinent.

The FBIS website offers visitors to the website access to a database of over one million names plus a wiki of background information. New recruits to the society are always welcome and have access to additional resources and fellow member interests.

As always the genealogists friend Wikipedia has a good article on the British Raj 1858 – 1947.

http://networkedblogs.com/GTN9r

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Raj

My Homes Past – House History

House History

Came across this new website today, I always think that family history easily partners with house history and this website concerns itself with the latter. The idea is that “My Homes Past” provides a link between photos and memories that we have of the houses we have lived in and the people who now live in those homes. It’s a lovely idea and it will be interesting to see if it catches on. 

To use the website you first need to register (another password to remember!!) and then you can add photographs, memories, real estate flyers and purchase and sale details. Once that is done I assume you sit back and see if anyone is also interested in that property.

At the time of writing the properties with details loaded onto the site are mainly in the Essex area and I suspect that they are those that the creators of the website have lived in.  I noted some Google ads on the site of the pages and I presume this is how the costs of the website will be covered. Running websites, as I know, isn’t cheap so I’m happy to have the ad’s there to help with the expenses.

This is a nice idea and if the take-up is sufficient then it will be a useful addition to family history.

http://myhomespast.co.uk/index.asp

Dixon-Scott Photographic Collection

Dixon-Scott Collection Family HistoryI am sure that some of you already know about the National Archives Labs website, but I didn’t and think that many of my readers also may have missed out on hearing about the Labs.

The Labs are a test area where the National Archives try improvements and new ideas out and then ask for feedback from those who visit the site. Generally a very interesting site to see what may be coming next at TNA.

One of the sections on the Labs website is the Dixon-Scott Collection which comprises 14,000 photographs taken between 1920 – 1940. This resource can be searched by location and viewed free of charge.

John Dixon-Scott became concerned about the way rural and urban England was changing and not always for the better. He toured England taking photographs of the vanishing landscape so that at least it was preserved in a visual form. If the town or village that your ancestral families lived in are amongst those featured in this collection then you will be able to get a glimpse of a lost way of life.

http://labs.nationalarchives.gov.uk/wordpress/index.php/2010/03/uk-history-photo-finder/

 

Hidden Lives – The Children’s Society

http://www.hiddenlives.org.uk/

The Hidden Lives website might not supply any names for your family history, but it does give a glimpse into the lives of the children who came under the care of The Waifs & Strays’ Society now know as The Children’s Society. The site focuses on the time period 1881 – 1918 and is made up of documents from the society’s archives. There is background information about children’s homes, fully searchable editions of the various publications of the society, photographs of the children and also examples of case files.

The society cared for children both in their residential homes and also in the community. None of the children are identified by name, but if you find one of your ancestors who were taken care of by The Children’s Society or a similar organisation this website will give you an understanding of the work undertaken to alleviate the suffering of the children and the lives of the children themselves.  

http://www.hiddenlives.org.uk/

NSW Colonial Secretary Papers 1788 – 1825

New South Wales Colonial Secretary Papers 1788 – 1825Just this minute Ancestry has added a new dataset to their Australian Collection. Hot off the press is the New South Wales Colonial Secretary Papers 1788 – 1825, NSW was the first part of Australia to be settled by the British so these documents are important to those who have early Australians on their family tree.

I’ll get around to posting a more in depth post later, but the Colonial Secretary Papers include requests for permission to marry, land grants, convict petitions and much more. Lots of lovely papers to browse through or to focus in on for an ancestor.

http://www.ancestry.co.uk