Licences of Parole for Female Convicts 1853-1887

Licences of Parole for Female Convicts 1853 1887<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>Gosh it’s hard to keep us with everything that is put onto the internet these days and it is easy to miss something. Today I was browsing the Ancestry Card Catalogue and found that sometime in 2010 Ancestry had put online a dataset of Licences of Parole for Female Convicts, 1853-1887.

This dataset contains the documents generated by the issuing of parole to female convicts. By being given parole the convicts were allowed to be ‘at large’, but if the authorities decided there was good reason the parole could be rescinded and the convict recalled to prison. The dataset contains some of these documents.

The records can be searched by

  • Year of the licence
  • Name
  • Estimated birth year
  • Court and year of conviction

The information that can be found varies, but can include next of kin, religion, literacy, physical description, a medical history, marital status, number of children, age, occupation, crime, sentence, dates and places of confinement, reports on behaviour while in prison, letters or notes from the convict, and (from 1871 forward) a photograph.

I did a search for Pottinger and found just one entry, the set of records for Elizabeth was 8 pages long and the information given was

Date of licence Name Age
Status Children Crime
Where and when convicted Sentence Which prison held
Literacy Occupation Next of kin
Health Previous criminal record if any Conduct
Description Conditions of parole

Elizabeth was sentenced to 3 years for fraud and was released on parole 13 days before the end of her sentence. One can only assume that they needed her bed !!

Even if you don’t have any female convicts on your family tree do go and look at some of these documents, they are just wonderful.

www.ancestry.co.uk

 

 

 

UK WW1 Army Records

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The scans of the first batch of WW1 army records are now available for browsing at your nearest LDS Family History Centre or at the Family History library in Salt Lake City. These records are also available at The National Archives in London where the originals are kept, as well they are indexed and available through Ancestry.co.uk.

The records date from the outbreak of WW1 in 1914 through to 1920. They comprise two sets of documents WO 363 which are the enlistment papers which were damaged in WW2 and are generally referred to as the “Burnt Documents” and WO 364 which are Pension Claims made by soldiers who suffered some disability due to service in WW1. It is worth bearing in mind that the Pension Claims include claims made by soldiers which weren’t accepted by the War Office, so if you have heard that your ancestor didn’t get a war pension this doesn’t mean he might not appear in this record set.

The Family Search website has a good wiki on WW1 Army Records available online at https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/United_Kingdom,_World_War_I_Service_Records_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)

The National Archives, London also has an online guide at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/britisharmysoldierafter1913.htm

https://familysearch.org/

www.ancestry.co.uk

British Jewry Book of Honour

British Jewry Book of Honour

Dominic Hayhoe of Forces War Records sent me an email to let me know that they have a new addition to their collection. They have transcribed the British Jewry Book of Honour that records the details of 50,000 Jews who served in the British & Colonial forces during WW1.

This important book was published in London in 1922 and gives details of enlistment, casualties, military honours as well as Jewish units, hospitals, institutions and agencies. So if you have Jewish ancestry you will want to access this publication.

http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/

Inner Temple Calendars 1505 – 1845

Inner Temple Calendars 1505   1845

Amazing what is coming online these days, it seems as if everyone has suddenly seen the advantage of digitizing their archives and placing them on the internet. A recent addition is the Calendars of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple 1505 – 1845. If you have ancestors who practised law then this site has to be a must.

I don’t understand the process whereby a graduate of law became admitted to an Inn and it’s chambers and then called to the bar, but I do know that this website has a lot to offer those with ancestors who practised law. The website offers a brief history of the site that the Inner Temple occupies, the buildings, the Archives as well as offer access to the digitized calendars and an Admissions database 1547 – 1920. Lots of lovely webpages to keep a genealogist happy.

A search of the Admissions database for the name Pottinger came up with 7 entries.

Using Richard Pottinger as an example I found the following on his record.

First name Richard
Last name (standard) Pottinger
Last name (given) Potenger
Admission date 22 April 1769
Call date n/a
Bench year n/a
Leaving date not known
Date of death not known
Judicial Appointment not known
Father’s name John Potenger
Father’s occupation Gentleman
Father/son relationship Eldest son
Father’s address City of London

I particularly liked that the surname was noted with a standard spelling and a given spelling. The surname Pottinger is one of those names that can have a wide variety of spellings and it seems that this database is well able to pick all the variations up in one search.

In my humble opinion m’ Lord a very useful website Inner Temple Calendars 1505   1845 

http://www.innertemple.org.uk/

Arley Hall, Cheshire archives now online

Arley Hall, Cheshire archives now online

Cheshire Family History Society members have been very busy of late, they have just completed a mammoth project of digitising more than 10,000 documents relating to the Arley Hall Estate. This material is now available online free and is a great gift to those with ancestors who had connections with Arley Hall.

The archive spans 1750 – 1790 and includes estate maps, receipts, invoices, staff lists and much more. I am sure there will be some wonderful family and local research undertaken now that these papers have become so easily available.

Congratulations to the Cheshire Family history Society and the custodians of the Arley Hall archival material.

http://www.arleyhallarchives.co.uk/