Licences of Parole for Female Convicts 1853-1887

Licences of Parole for Female Convicts, 1853-1887. Gosh it’s hard to keep us with everything that is put onto the internet these days and it is easy to miss something. Today I was browsing the Ancestry Card Catalogue and found that sometime in 2010 Ancestry had put online a dataset of Licences of Parole for Female Convicts, 1853-1887.

This dataset contains the documents generated by the issuing of parole to female convicts. By being given parole the convicts were allowed to be ‘at large’, but if the authorities decided there was good reason the parole could be rescinded and the convict recalled to prison. The dataset contains some of these documents.

The records can be searched by

  • Year of the licence
  • Name
  • Estimated birth year
  • Court and year of conviction

The information that can be found varies, but can include next of kin, religion, literacy, physical description, a medical history, marital status, number of children, age, occupation, crime, sentence, dates and places of confinement, reports on behaviour while in prison, letters or notes from the convict, and (from 1871 forward) a photograph.

I did a search for Pottinger and found just one entry, the set of records for Elizabeth was 8 pages long and the information given was

Date of licence Name Age
Status Children Crime
Where and when convicted Sentence Which prison held
Literacy Occupation Next of kin
Health Previous criminal record if any Conduct
Description Conditions of parole

Elizabeth was sentenced to 3 years for fraud and was released on parole 13 days before the end of her sentence. One can only assume that they needed her bed !!

Even if you don’t have any female convicts on your family tree do go and look at some of these documents, they are just wonderful.

www.ancestry.co.uk

 

 

 

London Livery Companies 1400 – 1900

The Institute of Historical Studies have placed online a searchable database of Apprentices and Freemen in the City of London Livery Companies between 1400 and 1900. The database is a work in progress and is a collaboration between The Centre for The Records of London's Livery Companies Online (ROLLCO).Metropolitan History, The Clothworkers’ Company, The Drapers’ Company, The Goldsmiths’ Company and The Mercers’ Company.

The database at the time of this post contains information from The Clothworkers’ Company 1545 – 1908 and The Drapers’ Company 1400 – 1900 and a sample of the data from the The Goldsmiths’ Company 1600 – 1700. More data will be added this later year.

A search for the name Pottinger in the records of the Clothworkers’ Company yielded 32 results. As an example one of the entries in the list of Pottingers gave the following information.

Year of event 1736
Name Eliza Pottinger
Gender Female
Occupation Sawyer
Location Facing The Vine Tavern, Holborn
Company Archive Clothworker
Event Apprenticeship
Role Master
Status Widow

As can be seen quite a lot of useful information can be found just from the index. No doubt further details can be found on application to the Livery Company Archives.

FindMyPast has an Index of Apprenticeship Taxes that has been compiled by the Society of Genealogists. It’s not all that easy to use, be prepared to work through several pages before you hit the surname you require. Below is an example of what you can expect to find.

58/191 – 1772 POTTINGER, Geo to Jn Morbey of Banbury, Oxon tay £5

The original taxation documents are held at the National Archives.

It is worth running a surname search through the A2A website as some Apprenticeship papers show up there with details of where the originals can be found. The index alone gives quite a lot of useful information. An example

Apprenticeship agreement between John Hill of Stratford upon Avon and William George Morris of Stratford upon Avon, scrivener, for a term of 5 years. 1801. The agreement also attests that John Rowden Westbury [the guardian of John Hill] shall provide clothes and wearing apparel.

Ancestry has the Freedom of the City of Londonclip_image002[5] Admission Papers, 1681-1925 which would be worth searching as many apprenticeship papers are included in the collection plus many apprentices went onto become Freeman of the City. The information that can be found is

  • Surname
  • Date of indenture
  • Parent or guardian’s name
  • County of residence
  • Master’s name

\With this collection you get to see a scan of the original papers which is always preferable to an index or transcript.

Finally should you find an apprentice or master in one of the databases it is always worth looking at their websites, some links below. The sites usually give excellent histories of the company as well as insights into their present work.

http://www.history.ac.uk/cmh/main

http://www.londonroll.org/home

http://www.clothworkers.co.uk/

http://www.thedrapers.co.uk/

http://www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk/

http://www.mercers.co.uk/

http://www.findmypast.co.uk

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a

www.ancestry.co.uk

Do search for Apprentices and Masters in your genealogy, the results can be most rewarding!

 

 

 

Navy Lists 1888 – 1970

Navy Lists 1888 -1970

 

The Navy List is the officially published list of Royal Navy Officers, publication started in 1819. Those who were officers (commissioned and warrant) in the Royal Navy, Royal Naval Reserves including the New Zealand branch, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Royal Naval College of Music, Royal Marines, Queen Alexandra’s Royal Nursing Services, Coast Guard and other branches of the senior service will be listed here.

Details that will be found in this dataset will be –

  • Name
  • Rank
  • Seniority
  • Decorations & Awards

The data is grouped in a variety of ways, by –

  • Rank
  • Ship
  • Pensioners
  • Retired Officers

Additional information on Royal Humane Society medal awards, Naval Regulations, Members of Boards, Vessels for sale and much more.

The data is indexed and may also be browsed by year of publication. A very useful database for those with ancestors who heeded the call of the sea.

www.ancestry.co.uk

WW1 & WW2 Memorial Books 1914 – 1945

Memorial Books, 1914-1945Ancestry has just released a set of three books that will add greatly to London researchers genealogy. They comprise details of people from the University of London Officers Training Corp and London City Council  who served in WW1 and residents of Croydon Borough who served in WW2. Details vary, but may contain the following information.

  • name
  • birth date
  • residence
  • military unit(s)
  • rank
  • dates of service
  • date, place, and cause of death
  • place of burial
  • POWs
  • honours and awards
  • photograph

Good see that such valuable, but generally unknown sources are becoming available on the internet.

www.ancestry.co.uk

 

Warwickshire Occupation Records

http://landing.ancestry.co.uk/popularmedia/hs1.aspxAncestry has been putting a teaser online over the last few days saying that new occupational records are going to be available on the 24th. These records which are now available come from the Quarter Session records held at the Warwickshire County Record Office so say Ancestry, but I am not sure they all do.

However it doesn’t matter if they have got confused as to what comes under quarter sessions (and it may well be me who is wrong!!) they are a very handy set of records. In my option the most valuable of the datasets are the Hearth Tax Returns, Freeholder Lists and the Juror’s Lists. If you are lucky enough to have ancestors in Warwickshire you will certainly be getting value for money out of your Ancestry subscription!!

The records have all been indexed and are also able to be browsed page by page.

  • Boat Owners Records, 1795-1796: Though Warwickshire is a landlocked county in the West Midlands, four major canals run through the area, and shipping by barge has been an important industry. These records list owners of boats.
  • Flax Bounty Records, 1774-1797: Flax was used to produce linen, an industry the government was interested in encouraging because processing, spinning, and weaving flax into linen could create many jobs. To promote linen production, the government offered a bounty to farmers who raised flax. These records are bonds of the flax growers and their sureties to the clerk of the peace that the grower was duly entitled to the bounty.
  • Lists of Freeholders, 1710-1760: These are lists of people entitled to vote, or of people who voted, at elections. A freeholder was a man who owned his land outright or who held it by lease for his lifetime or for the lives of other people named in the lease. This collection is largely 18th century.
  • Lists of Freemasons, 1799-1857: These annual returns of the names and descriptions of the members of Masonic lodges had to be presented to the Quarter Sessions in pursuance of the Unlawful Societies Act of 1799.
  • Hair Powder Certificates, 1795-1797: The practice of powdering hair began in England in the 17th century. At the end of the 18th century a duty of one pound one shilling a year was levied on everyone who continued to use hair powder. clip_image002[6]
  • Gamekeepers Records, 1744-1888: These records name individuals who were appointed as gamekeepers for specific estates, manors, forests, etc. These individuals may have had other occupations as well.
  • Hearth Tax Returns, 1662-1673: The hearth tax was a tax based on the number of hearths, or fireplaces, in a building.
  • Jurors’ Lists, 1696-1848: These lists of potential jurors can include occupation and street/residence.
  • Printing Press Owners Records, 1799-1866: These records include printers, publishers, and type founders.

www.ancestry.co.uk