FamilySearch Maps

FamilySearch Maps<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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Thank to my friend Judy I now know about the FamilySearch Maps. She emailed me the link and asked how long they had been online – who knows? Certainly I don’t ! If you haven’t had a look at them then go and take a look as soon as you have finished reading this…..

http://maps.familysearch.org/

You can opt in or out of several layers showing

  • Parish
  • County
  • Civil Registration District
  • Diocese
  • Rural Deanery
  • Poor Law Union
  • Hundred
  • Province
  • Division

Also there is a function whereby you can get various lists

  • Contiguous parishes
  • Radius place search

And then finally you can click to be taken to the

  • Search page
  • Catalogue
  • Family Tree page
  • Wiki

This is such a wonderful facility that it has already found it’s way onto my toolbar and I recommend that you earmark it as a favourite on your computer as well.

Thanks Judy FamilySearch Maps<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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1921 Canadian Census now online

1921 Canadian Census now onlineAncestry have released the digitised images of the Canadian 1921 census. They aren’t indexed yet so searching has to be conducted the “old” way – page by page. Like many English researchers I have ancestors who got on a boat for a whole variety of reasons and traded England for Canada. Again like others some of mine stayed and their descendants are still there whilst others decided that the wide open spaces of Canada wasn’t for them and returned. 

These records will be indexed in the fullness of time, but if you know approximately where your Canadian ancestors might have been living in 1921 then you will enjoy browsing these records.

http://www.ancestry.com

Online Ancestry Family Trees: Privacy and Sharing

This is a subject that often comes up in conversation amongst my genealogy friends – should you keep your online family trees hosted by the likes of Ancestry and FindMyPast private or allow them to be seen by one and all. This 25 minute video by Ancestry’s Crista Cowan explains the privacy rules for Ancestry’s online family trees and then shows you how to share your tree with others.

Online Ancestry Family Trees: Privacy and Sharing

I have four family trees on Ancestry, each starting from a grandparent, and they are at the moment private, but I do reply to all the requests from other researchers for access and information. However once I have checked and sourced each person on the trees I will make them public so that the research and information won’t be lost once I’m not here anymore. Not that I intend becoming an ancestor for a long time yet Online Ancestry Family Trees: Privacy and Sharing<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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I recently heard that Ancestry are thinking of Online Ancestry Family Trees: Privacy and Sharing<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>instigating a traffic light system to grade the millions of trees that are on their site. I understand that red will mean the tree is small, hasn’t been added to for a long time and hasn’t any sources, amber will indicate a larger tree with some sources and green will indicate that the tree is actively being worked on, is well sourced and documented. I think this is an excellent idea and hopefully it will give some well earned recognition to those awarded green who work hard on making their trees good, historical documents and encourage the amber tree owners to make the leap and start improving their trees to green. As for the red trees well I suspect they are a lost cause, probably the result of a free 14 day trial of Ancestry taken out on a wet Sunday afternoon!

Christa is always worth listening to so click on the start button and learn what Ancestry does to protect the privacy of those living, how to share trees with other family members and other related topics.

London Clandestine Marriage & Banns Registers 1667 – 1754

London Clandestine Marriage & Banns Registers 1667 – 1754I was talking about irregular or clandestine marriages on Saturday & Sunday at the NZ Family History Fair and now right on cue Ancestry has released London Clandestine Marriage & Banns Registers 1667 – 1754. These marriages aren’t just confined to those who lived in London, but include couples who were seeking a private marriage away from prying, disapproving eyes. These particular records are the Registers of Clandestine Marriages and of Baptisms in the Fleet Prison, King’s Bench Prison, the Mint and the May Fair Chapel.

Ancestry has a good description about the marriages in their introduction to the record set and Archive.org has a copy of a printed transcript by John Southern Burn. The Ancestry registers aren’t transcripts but digitised images of the originals that have been indexed so are the best option to use.

I did my usual sample search and came up with the following entry which illustrates how useful the records are…..

John Ffreth & Eliz Joshley were married the 12 April 1702, the man from Cranford near Redlyon and the woman of Broughton in Kent.

So you can see how useful this dataset is.

Happy Ancestor Hunting!

Links

www.ancestry.co.uk

www.archive.org/fleetregisters

 

Inside History’s Cassie Mercer

Inside History’s Cassie MercerWhilst at the New Zealand Family History Fair I had the pleasure to interview Cassie Mercer, the Editor & Publisher of Inside History. The magazine was established in November 2010 so is a fairly new addition to the news-stand, but with a print circulation of 7,000 and 10,000 registered digital users it has made it’s presence felt in the genealogy/history publication world.

Cassie told me that she couldn’t help but be involved in family history as her mother, Barbara Hall, is a keen genealogist and is the author of five books about Irish Convicts sent to Australia prior to 1800. Barbara’s website is the well known Irish Wattle. On her maternal side Cassie has what she described as rogues and criminals from Ireland, England and Scotland to balance this out her paternal side is all from England and they are generally law-abiding!

A favourite ancestor is Edward Turley a Dubliner who came to Australia in 1796 definitely Aussie Royalty ! Edward was found guilty of being a highwayman.

Asked what the future held for her magazine Cassie told me she plans to add more bonus content, make the digital magazine experience richer and increase the New Zealand content. All this adds up to a bright future for Inside History.Inside History’s Cassie Mercer

MadAboutGenealogy has been named as one of the Inside History 50 Top Blogs 2013, I didn’t find this out until after I had interviewed Cassie so didn’t have a chance to say “Thank You”. So many thanks Cassie and the team at Inside History!

Links

http://www.insidehistory.com.au/

http://irishwattle.com/about

http://www.nzfamilyhistoryfair.org.nz/