Calendar of Patent Rolls

For most genealogists the big question having read the title of this post is what are Calendar of Patent Rolls<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>Patent Rolls? And why not ask the question because they aren’t standard genealogy fare. Here is a description written by National Archives …..

Grants of official positions, or land, or commissions are made by the Crown as letters patent (i.e. open letters) issued under the Great Seal. They are addressed ‘To all to whom these presents shall come’. Copies were and are enrolled (to act as a record) on the Patent Rolls, now in The National Archives, in C 66.

The Patent Rolls run in almost unbroken series from 1201 to the present day (although there are significant gaps for the Civil War and Interregnum period). Latin is the usual language in the early period, but some entries are in English even in the sixteenth century. In the 1650s and after 1733 all entries are in English.

They record a huge variety of documents issued under the Great Seal – treaties, charters, grants of land, offices, titles and pensions, judicial commissions, pardons, patents for inventions, licences, leases of crown lands, presentations to churches, grants of markets and fairs, etc.

I have no idea why the University of Iowa should have these Patent Rolls on their website, but they do and they are freely available for use by researchers and teachers. All they ask is that you acknowledge the source and of course as good genealogists you would do that Calendar of Patent Rolls<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/patentrolls/

Technorati Tags: University of Iowa,Calendar of Patent Rolls,Archives,Genealogy,Family History

Warwickshire Online Databases

Whilst we are on the subject of Warwickshire …….. the Warwickshire Record Office has a range of online databases which would be very helpful to those with Warwickshire family.

Victuallers Database
The Victuallers database is a database containing details of licensed victuallers in Warwickshire from 1801-1828. The information has been taken from the series of registers of calendars of Victuallers’ Recognizances held by the County Record Office.

Tithe Apportionments Database
The
Tithe Apportionments database contains information from the Warwickshire tithe apportionments, produced after the Tithe Commutation Act of 1836. Not all our parishes have apportionments, but those that have now appear on this website and the data entry is complete.

Calendar of Prisoners
The Calendars of Prisoners database is an index to the ‘Calendars of Prisoners’ or lists of those held in the County Prisons (in Warwick, Birmingham and Coventry) for trial at the Courts of Assize and the Quarter Sessions courts held in Warwick between 1800 and 1900.

Windows on Warwickshire
Windows on Warwickshire is a searchable database of images of historic photographs and other items held at Warwickshire museums, archives and libraries, as well as Compton Verney Art Gallery and Warwick Castle.

http://www.warwickshire.gov.uk

Technorati Tags: Warwickshire,Record Office,Archives,Tithes,Prison Records,Victuallers,Family History,Genealogy

 

Guide to Salt Lake City

Through reading Dick Eastman’s blog I came across this great guide to Salt Lake City it is called “The Chart Chick’s Quick Insider’s Guide to Salt Lake City”. Written by Janet Hovorka it is an excellent guide to Salt Lake City for genealogist, she covers all aspects of a trip to Salt Lake City. Wish I had had this before my first trip there!!

The guide is available as a free PDF download and if you want a paper copy that is available for $15 US.

http://thechartchick.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/chart-chicks-quick-insiders-guide-to.html

Technorati Tags: Chart Chick,Dick Eastman,Salt Lake City,Guide,Genealogy,Family History

Bodleian Library periodicals online

Bodleian Library periodicals onlineDid you know that the Bodleian Library in Oxford has put some of it’s vast holding of periodicals online. Amongst the offerings are the “Gentleman’s Magazine” 1731 – 1750 and “Notes & Queries” 1849 – 1869.

Both of these publications have plenty to interest the family historian. The Gentleman’s Magazine has an index for each volume (one volume per year) and Notes & Queries also has a yearly index. I think to get the best out of these publications you need to browse through a volume to see how things are laid out and then dive into some research. A very wide range of subjects are covered in each edition including many announcements of births, marriages & deaths.

Take a look.

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/ilej/journals/

Technorati Tags: Bodleian Library,Oxford University,Gentlemans Magazine,Notes & Queries,Genealogy,Family History

Ragged Schools: Education for the poor

Ragged Schools: Education for the poorNow sit up straight, no talking, arms folded ……. hands up all those who have ancestors who might have attended a Ragged School? Yes I can see that most of you have your hands up and those who haven’t just have not been attending in history class !!!!!!

If you have poor folk sitting on the branches of your family tree then the chances are some of them attended a ragged school and perhaps learnt enough to sign their names in the parish register when they got married or advanced themselves in life by having had a basic education.

If you happen to live or be visiting London then a trip to the Ragged School Museum might be a worthwhile use of a morning or afternoon. Housed in what was London’s largest Ragged School this family friendly museum offers an experience of what it was like for the East End poor a century & more ago.

http://www.raggedschoolmuseum.org.uk

Technorati Tags: Ragged Schools,Education,Poverty,London,Museum,Family History,Genealogy