London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes

London, Edinburgh and Belfast GazettesGenealogists have been able to access historic gazettes for some years and very useful they have been in family history research. A recent press release from National Archives tells us that access to the gazettes has been improved and the website re-designed and re-launched.

The London Gazette is the oldest, continually published newspaper in the world. Although the three publications are know as the London Gazette, Edinburgh Gazette and the Belfast Gazette they contain details of individuals from all over the United Kingdom so a search is always worthwhile taking the time to do. A history of the gazette is available on the National Archives website.London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes

A search for one of my family names “Pottinger” came up with 654 entries dating from 1742 – July 2013 a wide range of dates and information. The earliest entry concerns an ancestor of mine John Pottinger of Compton, Berkshire, it calls for creditors to register with the Court of Chancery and the latest entry is a listing of a business in Belfast owned by a Peter Pottinger who almost certainly is a descendant of the Pottinger family who left Berkshire and moved to Northern Ireland. All sorts of genealogy treasure will be hidden amongst the other 652 entries. A good, wet Sunday  afternoon, project to work through them all !

Links

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

https://www.thegazette.co.uk/

Huguenot Family History

Huguenot Family HistoryI’ve written about the marvellous National Archives Podcast series quite a few times and I make no apologises for mentioning them again. The latest podcast is by renown historian and genealogist Dr Kathy Chater.

From the 1500’s many people fled Europe because of religious persecution, England was often their final destination where they settled and may well feature in your family tree.  These refugees were known as Huguenots, and are represented in the genealogy world by the wonderful Huguenot Society who have published many volumes of records.

This podcast entitled “Tracing Huguenot Ancestors” will assist in finding out if you have Huguenot’s on a branch of your family tree and give much useful information on exploring these interesting ancestors more fully.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/tracing-huguenot-ancestors/

http://www.huguenotsociety.org.uk/

New Podcasts at The National Archives

New Podcasts at The National ArchivesThe Podcast Series on The National Archives website is great for all levels of family historians. The latest additions to the collection are

A real mix of subjects and something to interest everyone.

Below is the link for the Podcast Archive where the complete list of what’s on offer is available.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

 

Coroners’ Inquests

Coroners’ InquestsA recent addition to the wonderful National Archives podcast series is a talk on Coroners’ Inquests by Dr Kathy Chater. Coroners’ Inquests are a real treasure for genealogists if you find one for your ancestors met an untimely end. Of course your ancestor may not have been the subject of the inquest they may have been the coroner, a member of the jury or a witness so if you are searching an index of coroners’ inquests then it is worth while searching under place as well as name. Anything that happened in the village or town where your ancestors lived will be of interest.

You can expect to find the name and address of the deceased, the what, where and when of the death, names of witnesses and details of their evidence, names of the jury and the coroner.

Kathy Chater is well known for her books on genealogy as well as her informative talks on family history.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/coroners-inquests

 

 

 

Nottinghamshire Manorial Records

Nottinghamshire Manorial RecordsNottinghamshire has added the catalogue of their Manorial Records onto the Manorial Documents Register. This means you will be able to search online at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/mdr/ to find out what documents have survived and where they are houses. Manorial records aren’t always where you would expect them to be ie at the county record office. For instance the Nottinghamshire records are held at nearly 50 different locations.

More information can be found at the following sites…

 

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/mdr/

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/manuscriptsandspecialcollections/researchguidance/manorial/introduction.aspx

 

There is an excellent podcast by Liz Hart on Manorial Records for those unfamiliar with these valuable records.http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/podcasts/manorial-documents-register.htm