Ancestry Trees–Merge option and other anomalies

Ancestry Trees–Merge option and other anomalies<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

google ad client = pub 7451644351213684; google alternate color = FFFFFF;
google ad width = 468; google ad height = 60; google ad format = 468x60 as;
google ad type = text image;
google ad channel =; google color border = 336699;
google color link = 0000FF; google color bg = FFFFFF;
google color text = 000000; google color url = 008000;
google ui features = rc:0; //  ></script>
<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>

Hooray …. at last …….. not before time ……..

The reason for my jubilation is that is the latest email from Ancestry they have announced that you can now merge two individuals on your Ancestry trees. There are many ways whereby you end up with two or more entries for one ancestors, a common one is when one parents dies between census and if you aren’t paying attention and just click away you can end up with the surviving parents having two families with children of the same name. If you have never done this then you will wonder what I am on about, but if you have you’ll know exactly how annoying it is!!

The email has the merge instruction under Top Tips and a link to the website. Clicking on the link takes you to the Ancestry Blog with an entry dated 7 December 2012 giving clear instruction on how to tidy up your tree using the new merge tool. On this page are several screen shots and the one that shows the drop down box of “More Options” has a list of options

  • Add a note
  • Create a military page
  • Find famous relatives
  • Save person to another tree
  • Merge with duplicate

Now when I clicked on the “More Options” tab on my Southwell tree I got a drop down box that just had

  • Add a note
  • Save person to another tree
  • Merge with duplicate

I suspected the difference was becauseAncestry Trees–Merge option and other anomalies<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

google ad client = pub 7451644351213684; google alternate color = FFFFFF;
google ad width = 468; google ad height = 60; google ad format = 468x60 as;
google ad type = text image;
google ad channel =; google color border = 336699;
google color link = 0000FF; google color bg = FFFFFF;
google color text = 000000; google color url = 008000;
google ui features = rc:0; //  ></script>
<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p> I was logging into Ancestry.co.uk so I logged into Ancestry.com, open up my tree and yes, my theory was right the additional options were there. I have a Worldwide subs so I can log into .com, but I assume that if you just have a .uk subs you can’t. Wonder why the difference, if Ancestry read this and get back to me I’ll let you know why. In the meantime just enjoy merge all those ancestors who seem to have morphed into two people. Nothing like having a tidy family tree Ancestry Trees–Merge option and other anomalies<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

google ad client = pub 7451644351213684; google alternate color = FFFFFF;
google ad width = 468; google ad height = 60; google ad format = 468x60 as;
google ad type = text image;
google ad channel =; google color border = 336699;
google color link = 0000FF; google color bg = FFFFFF;
google color text = 000000; google color url = 008000;
google ui features = rc:0; //  ></script>
<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>

http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/12/07/member-trees-merge

Image – Portraits of six generations of Sterberg family in Jiří Sternberg’s study – Wikimedia This image was originally posted to Flickr by m-louis at http://flickr.com/photos/32413914@N00/95221116. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Outward Passenger Lists 1890 – 1960

Outward Passenger Lists 1890   1960What a good start to 2013, Ancestry has just released a new dataset, Outward Passenger Lists 1890 – 1960. The information concerns passengers leaving UK ports for destinations outside of Europe and covers a time period when emigration was popular and easy as not so many visa, work permits etc. were required. Ancestry tells us that the pre 1890 passenger lists have not survive, which is a great shame.

Not everyone on these lists were emigrating however, some would have been those returning home after a trip to the UK or simply off on holiday.

Generally you can expect to find the following information.

  • name
  • age at departure
  • gender
  • profession
  • last address in the UK
  • last country of permanent residence
  • country of intended permanent residence
  • port of departure
  • country of departure
  • date of departure
  • port of destination
  • country of destination
  • ship name
  • shipping line
  • ship master’s name

Outward Passenger Lists 1890   1960For example a search for Robert Southey Pottinger showed the following

  • Robert Southey Pottinger
  • Aboard the Malwa, a ship of the P & O S N company
  • Left London 9 December 1921
  • Last UK Address Teign Royal, Teignmouth, Devon
  • 1st class cabin
  • Destined for Bombay, India
  • Occupation – Indian Army
  • 51 years of age
  • Last permanent residence – India
  • Future permanent residence – India
  • He was traveling with his wife Mrs Muriel Pottinger, 31 years of age.

Quite a lot of useful genealogical information to be found amongst these records and might solve a mystery for some family historians as to where a certain person was on census night !

The originals of these records are held at Kew and are Records of the Board of Trade BT26 & BT27.

www.ancestry.co.uk

Image SS Malwa – released by State Library of Queensland under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 license

England & Wales Maps 1896–1904 now on Ancestry

England & Wales Maps 1896–1904 now on Ancestry<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

google ad client = pub 7451644351213684; google alternate color = FFFFFF;
google ad width = 468; google ad height = 60; google ad format = 468x60 as;
google ad type = text image;
google ad channel =; google color border = 336699;
google color link = 0000FF; google color bg = FFFFFF;
google color text = 000000; google color url = 008000;
google ui features = rc:0; //  ></script>
<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>I thought Ancestry might give their subscribers a Christmas gift or two and this release is a useful addition to their genealogy offerings. Maps are essential to family historians, if you don’t know where your ancestors lived, was it a rural or an industrial location,which towns and villages were within walking distance, was there a railway or canal nearby? All this information can give important clues to the lives of your family.

This dataset comprises 122 Victorian maps dating from 1896. The maps show railways lines & stations, schools, roads, canals, public houses, farms and rivers & streams. The originals are the Ordnance Survey Revised New Series.

Unfortunately the individual maps aren’t dated on the database,but as the time period only spans six year I don’t suppose it matters greatly. Lastly there is also a facility to purchase a paper copy of the maps via a link to Cassini Maps.

A good addition to the Ancestry stable of genealogy resources.

www.ancestry.co.uk

Doncaster Records go online

Doncaster Records go onlineOh to have genealogy interests in the Doncaster region !!

FindMyPast has added a plethora of records for this area in the West Riding of Yorkshire. These records are transcripts and so may not give all the information that the original records hold, however they are a great resource for family history. Always check with the original records if at all possible and note that whilst the press release says they are records covering 1537 – 1986 this won’t apply to all the parishes.

Also included in this release are burial records including plot references for the Hyde Park Cemetery in Doncaster.

The records have been provided by the Doncaster Family History Society.

www.findmypast.co.uk

Below is a table of the parishes covered. 

Parish Baptisms Burials
ADLINGFLEET ALL SAINTS yes yes
ADWICK-LE-STREET yes
AIRMYN ST DAVID yes yes
ARDSLEY yes
ARKSEY ALL SAINTS WITH BENTLEY yes yes
ASKERN yes
AUCKLEY yes
AUSTERFIELD ST HELENA yes yes
BALBY ST JOHN yes yes
BARNBURGH ST PETER’S yes yes
BARNBY DUN ST PETER & ST PAUL yes yes
BAWTRY yes
BOLTON ON DEARNE yes
BRAITHWELL ST JAMES yes yes
BRAMPTON BIERLOW CHRIST CHURCH yes yes
BRODSWORTH yes
BURGHWALLIS yes
CAMPSALL yes
CANTLEY ST WILFRID yes yes
CONISBOROUGH yes
COWICK yes
DARFIELD yes
DENABY yes
DONCASTER CHRIST CHURCH yes
EASTOFT yes
FISHLAKE ST CUTHBERT yes yes
FRICKLEY yes
GOOLE ST JOHN yes yes
GOOLE SNAITH CHAPELS yes
HATFIELD ST LAWRENCE yes
HENSALL CUM HECK ST PAUL yes yes
HICKLETON yes
HIGH MELTON yes
HOOK ST MAR yes yes
HOOTON PAGNELL yes
KILNHURST yes
LOVERSALL yes
MARR ST HELEN yes yes
MEXBOROUGH ST JOHN THE BAPTIST yes yes
MOSS yes
OLD EDLINGTON yes
OWSTON ALL SAINTS yes yes
POLLINGTON ST JOHN THE BAPTIST yes yes
RAWCLIFFE ST JAMES yes yes
ROSSINGTON yes
SKELBROOKE yes
SNAITH ST LAWRENCE yes yes
SPROTBOROUGH yes
STAINTON yes
STAINFORTH ST MARY yes
SWINEFLEET yes
SWINTON yes
SYKEHOUSE HOLY TRINITY yes
THURNSCOE ST HELEN yes yes
WADWORTH ST JOHN THE BAPTIST yes yes
WARMSWORTH yes
WATH yes
WENTWORTH yes
WHITGIFT yes
WOODLANDS ALL SAINTS yes

Bromfield, Claverley, Westbury, Shropshire parish transcripts

Bromfield, Claverley, Westbury, Shropshire parish transcriptsAs often happens when browsing the internet and the Ancestry Card catalogue in particular I came across something I wasn’t looking for !! Having found these transcripts I thought it would be useful to some Shropshire genealogists out there somewhere to know that this un-indexed set of parish register transcripts for Bromfield, Claverley and Westbury are available online.

As I said above these are transcripts of the originals registers and they aren’t indexed onto the main Ancestry search engine so a search under surname won’t bring them up. The transcripts are for the following time periods -

  • Bromfield 1559 – 1812
  • Claverley 1568 – 1837
  • Westbury 1638 – 1812

The transcripts were made by the Shropshire Bromfield, Claverley, Westbury, Shropshire parish transcriptsParish Register Society some years ago and although the books have been well used the transcriptions are very clear. The introduction giving information and background to the parish is well worth spending the time reading. At the end of each volume there is a place name and a surname index.

A bonus for those with family history in Shropshire. I’d better go and try and find the records I was looking for before I stumbled across these transcripts!

Image – St Mary the Virgin, Bromfield, near to Bromfield, Shropshire, Great Britain. Originally a Benedictine Priory church, dating from 1155, with 13th and 16th century additions and restored in 1890. The copyright on this image is owned by Ian Capper and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.