WW1 Shipping Records Online

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FindMyPast hasn’t released much in the last few weeks, perhaps they are getting ready to announce something big or simply don’t have anything new ready to offer us? However today they have released a dataset of a list of British Royal Navy ships destroyed during World War 1.

The original records are housed at The National Archives, Kew where you inspect them free of charge. If you can’t get to Kew then FindMyPast is the way to access these records, the details you can expect are as follows -

  • Ship name
  • Date it was destroyed
  • Number of officers killed or wounded
  • Type of vessel
  • How and where it was destroyed

Used in conjunction with the other WW1 records on FindMyPast they are a useful addition to the Naval records now online.

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Royal Navy Museum

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>If you have ancestors who were members of the Royal Navy, whatever their rank – low or high – there is sure to be some great background information on this web site. You might even be tempted to visit the museum and use their archives whilst the family take a tour of HMS Victory and browse in the museum and shop.

 

http://royalnavalmuseum.org/index.htm

 

Navy Medical Journals

 

Navy Medical JournalsAncestry.co.uk has put another dataset online, this time it is Royal Navy Medical Journals & Surgeon Superintendents Journals. So if you have ancestors with salt water in their veins this might be just the sort of records that could help in your research.

Ancestry has this to say about the material on offer……

A variety of people travelled the seas in the 19th century, from experienced sailors to convicts. Our latest two record collections shed light on the experiences of all these groups after they left shore.
Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-1857, and Surgeon Superintendents’ Journals of Convict Ships, 1858–1867, are both sets of diaries kept by ships’ medical officers. They reveal everything from serious diseases to grog-related accidents — along with accounts of how each was treated at the time. You can search for patients by name, but even if your relatives weren’t among the sick, the records provide a rare insight into life at sea.

www.ancestry.co.uk