Bunhill Fields Burials now online

Bunhill Fields Burials now online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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One of most fascinating burial grounds in London is now online – Bunhill Fields. North of the square mile of the City of London this is where your non-conformist/dissenter ancestors may well have been buried. The original records are kept at the National Archives under RG4. The time span for this collection is 1713 – 1854.

Wikipedia has a good page on Bunhill – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunhill_Fields

As does the Blake Society – http://www.blakesociety.org/blakes-grave/bunhill-fields-a-history/

It looks as if it might be a sunny weekend so nothing like a new set of genealogy data to browse whilst in a deck-chair in the garden Bunhill Fields Burials now online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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 https://www.deceasedonline.com

Image – Creative Commons David Williams http://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/2216

Spectator Archive

Spectator Archive<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls3 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>Isn’t the internet marvellous ? Always something popping up that you weren’t aware of that will be useful in your genealogy. This time it is the Spectator Archive website. This publication started in 1828 and for the period 1828 – 2008 every page has been scanned and digitised, each article tagged and extracted, so that you can search the whole archive by content, keyword, topic, location, and date. Plus this is online free of charge Spectator Archive<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls3 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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http://archive.spectator.co.uk/

West Yorkshire Reform Schools 1779-1914

West Yorkshire Reform Schools 1779 1914Do you have ancestors that might have, through bad deeds or plain bad luck, ended up an inmate at a West Yorkshire Reform School ?  This new database from Ancestry covers

Calder Farm Reformatory

East Moor Community Home School

Shadwell Children’s Centre.

And includes admissions, commitments, and discharges records, so a wide range of data. The information you can expect to find is

 

  • name
  • age
  • birth date and place
  • father’s name
  • mother’s name

West Yorkshire Reform Schools 1779 1914Also if you are lucky you might also find

  • Photo
  • Physical description
  • Baptism details
  • School attended
  • Criminal history
  • Admission details
  • Religion
  • Other relatives and addresses
  • Trade or occupation

The privacy cut-off date for these records is 1914.

Ancestry.co.uk

Canada 1921 Census

Canada 1921 Census

Ancestry has added the1921 census for Canada to it’s Canadian and Worldwide Collection. Many people emigrated from the British Isles to Canada in search of a better life and more opportunities to further themselves. Some came back, but many stayed so it is always a good idea to run family names through the Canadian Collection to see if anyone familiar shows up. In fact the population of Canada rose by 1,581,840 between the 1911 and the 1921 census so all those people belong on someone’s family tree !

Fully indexed the census is easy to search, simply put in family names and press “search”. The information collected by the Canadian authorities was much more extensive than the English census so many details of the person can be discovered.

Well worth running family names through, enjoy this more recent census.

www.Ancestry.com

 

Canterbury Archive Collection online

Just a couple of hours ago FindMyPast announced the launch online of the Canterbury Collection. This is a major addition to their offerings for Kent and is a significant archive to have as a partner.

What is the Canterbury Archive Collection?

The Canterbury Collection is housed in the Canterbury Cathedral Archives which at the present time is undergoing extensive building works and is closed until the autumn of Canterbury Archive Collection online2012. The archive holds records relating to the cathedral and city of Canterbury, Kent, the parishes within the historic Archdeaconry of Canterbury, other local institutions and local family archives. A catalogue of their holdings is online at www.archives.canterbury-cathedral.org

FindMyPast and the Canterbury Archives announced their partnership earlier this year and it has meant that whilst the archives are closed the material is still available for research. Also, of course, it means that those who are unable to visit Canterbury can now have access to the documents. The documents released today are of the parish registers of the churches within the Archdeaconry, and is of scanned images not transcripts so it is as good as being at the archives. The images at the present time have not been indexed, but it is hoped that indexes will be available later this year.

What can you expect to find in the Canterbury Archive Collection?

A lesson on parish registers can be found at Mad About Genealogy’s sister site Teach Yourself Family History, this lesson explains what details the records will contain at what time period.

How to use the Canterbury Archive Collection.

The collection is available on www.findmypast.co.uk which is one of the major subscription website. The records will also be available at the Canterbury Cathedral Archives once they reopen in the autumn. It would be wise to phone the archives first to ascertain when the archives will be re-opened and to book a seat in the reading room as space is limited.

Canterbury Archive Collection online

Because the images have not been indexed the “old” way of researching will have to be employed. The parish will need to be identified as the most likely place for the event to have occurred and the time period that it would have happened in. Then it is a case of reading through the register page by page. This won’t be as onerous as it sounds as the registers make fascinating reading.

The time period covered is 1538 – 2005, but of course this period will vary parish to parish depending on when the church was built and if the records have survived.

So if you have ancestors in Canterbury Archdeaconry of Kent then this collection certainly merits time spent researching.

Links

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org

www.findmypastco.uk