Welsh Parish Registers online

Welsh Parish Registers online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.1   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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I usually confine myself to English records because that is where my area of expertise is, but I have been asked to include notices about additions to the collections offered by Ancestry and FindMyPast. So here goes ….

FindMyPast has added 2 million records to their Welsh Parish Register Collection. This is the first time that Welsh parish records have been made available online.

The new addition consists of

Baptisms: 2,083,430 records covering 1538-1912

Marriages: 1,226,650 records covering 1539-1927

Banns: 557,078 records covering 1603-1927

Burials: 2,057,453 records covering 1539-2007

These records cover the following counties: Anglesey, Brecknockshire, Caernarvonshire, Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Glamorganshire, Merionethshire, Monmouthshire, Montgomeryshire, Pembrokeshire and Radnorshire.

The Welsh County Archivists Group and the National Library of Wales are the holders of the original records.

www.findmypast.co.uk

The Waterways Trust

The Waterways Trust<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.1   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls3 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>This website is a must for those with ancestors who worked the canals. The site includes the National Waterways Museum, Gloucester Waterways Museum and the Canal Museum, in Northamptonshire. The archives of the trust hold a host of material concerning the history of canals & inland waterways, include early canal companies records, boat-building plans, working records, accounts, letters and photographs.

Remember that if you have family who were canal folk then search along the canal for churches were children may have been christened, family members buried and where marriages might have taken place. Canal people weren’t attached to a static parish, but it is known that some families did favour certain churches along the canal route.

http://www.thewaterwaystrust.org.uk/

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The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London

The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of LondonThis website sadly doesn’t have their records online, but it does give information on how to access the records and has a separate page about family history. If you have discovered an Apothecary on your family tree then it would be well worth your while to try and research further. Some fascinating records and history could await you.

http://www.apothecaries.org/

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Northumberland Archives

Northumberland ArchivesI’ve just had a look at the website for Northumberland Archives and see that they offer a Personal Mentoring Service, it is a bit pricey at £52 for two hours, but it could be just the thing to get you over a brick wall. There are the usual pages of opening hours, user guides etc. and the catalogue includes part of the collection and is being added to regularly. Of interest is that some of the documents have been scanned and are available online.

http://www.experiencewoodhorn.com/collections/

Calendar of Patent Rolls

For most genealogists the big question having read the title of this post is what are Calendar of Patent RollsPatent Rolls? And why not ask the question because they aren’t standard genealogy fare. Here is a description written by National Archives …..

Grants of official positions, or land, or commissions are made by the Crown as letters patent (i.e. open letters) issued under the Great Seal. They are addressed ‘To all to whom these presents shall come’. Copies were and are enrolled (to act as a record) on the Patent Rolls, now in The National Archives, in C 66.

The Patent Rolls run in almost unbroken series from 1201 to the present day (although there are significant gaps for the Civil War and Interregnum period). Latin is the usual language in the early period, but some entries are in English even in the sixteenth century. In the 1650s and after 1733 all entries are in English.

They record a huge variety of documents issued under the Great Seal – treaties, charters, grants of land, offices, titles and pensions, judicial commissions, pardons, patents for inventions, licences, leases of crown lands, presentations to churches, grants of markets and fairs, etc.

I have no idea why the University of Iowa should have these Patent Rolls on their website, but they do and they are freely available for use by researchers and teachers. All they ask is that you acknowledge the source and of course as good genealogists you would do that Calendar of Patent Rolls

http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/patentrolls/

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