Clergy Ancestors in Your Family History?

Do You Have Any Clergy Ancestors?

If so then this is a must search website. This site proved to be very useful to me when I have been researching my Pottinger family history, the females seemed to be rather attracted to the life of a clergyman’s wife. I must say the thought of a clerical wife always brings to mind the scene from Pride and Prejudice when Elizabeth Bennett visits her friend Charlotte who has married the Rev William Collins. Charlotte mentions that married life suits her as she and Mr Collins spend much time apart !

Anyway back to genealogy ….. This website brings together data regarding the careers of clergy from over fifty archives in England and Wales and is the first call for any family history research into clerical ancestors.

The latest update was in March 2017 and it is still being worked on. The modern Exeter data has been reviewed and work is continuing on the diocese of Lichfield and Coventry. I understand that information from the Patent Rolls 1540 – 1660 has been included as has material from Peterborough.

How To use this Family History Database

Easy to use you simply click on the Database tab at the top, enter the surname you are interested in and click search. Then it is just a case of exploring all the tabs and links within the panel concerning your ancestor. I think this is one of those websites where you need to schedule a return visit every few months so that you can keep up to date with any new additions.

http://theclergydatabase.org.uk/

10% off Find My Past subscriptions

Just got this message through that Find My Past is offering MadAboutGenealogy readers a 10% discount on an annual subscription. I subscribe to FindMyPast and of late have been using the 1939 Register dataset quite a lot, it is almost a census for that moment in time just before the start of WW2. I also have been having great success using their parish registers. It is a joy not only having them indexed, but also being able to search the “old fashioned” way by working through the register page by page. That way I get to know what is happening in the parish and gives me the opportunity to pick up entries for the extended family. I love it, just like being in a county archives, but without the cost of travel and accommadation.

So if you have been thinking of subscribing then here’s a good opportunity to save yourself some money – more for the genealogy kitty! Click on the link on the side panel.

 

 

New Workhouse Records Online

Ancestry.co.uk has put some interesting workhouse records online. I hadn’t heard of this series of records recording every adult in a workhouse for 5 years or

more before. It appears that in 1861 the House of Commons ordered that the name, time spent in the workhouse, the reason for admission to the workhouse and whether they had been bought up in a district or workhouse school be compiled and the results analysed. What they were trying to achieve I can’t imagine as it wasn’t going to stop poverty or ill health which were the main causes for admission into the workhouse.

Anyway as genealogists we can be grateful that this list of about 67,800 adults is now available for us to search. I can see this will be a useful addition to the 1861 census as it captures the names of those who died prior to that census. Shown is an example of the records. I shall run my family names through the search and see who pops up I can think of one or two who should be in there ! Ancestry.co.uk

 

 

 

 

Wiltshire Records now online

I see that www.ancestry.co.uk now has the Wiltshire parish registers online. These are digitised and indexed images of the registers held at the Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre. It looks as if all the parishes are included in this latest release, but I am sure that there will be some updates over the next few months so if you don’t find who you are looking for at first it is always worth re-doing your search a few months later.

The Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre website also has a really good wills catalogue that can be searched free of charge a copy of the will can be purchased for £5. I have had some significant success using the index and can thoroughly recommend it.

Birth & Death Indexes

I am sure you all probably know that when you first start your family history research your first port of call after having reviewed all the records your family already has is to look at Birth, Marriage and Death indexes.

Up until fairly recently the early indexes didn’t give many clues such as age at death that the later indexes did. These indexes can be viewed on Ancestry, Find My Past, Free BMD and other sites. However that has now all changed. The General Register Office have put their indexes online and have included the details that the later indexes do not.

Hooray !!

Now this makes it so much easier to fill in gaps going back to 1837 when the registration of births, deaths and marriages started to be recorded by the government.

So here is how you set about using these indexes.

Go to  https://www.gov.uk/order-copy-birth-death-marriage-certificate

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Click on the green “Start Now” button

 


 

 

Clickimage on the “Register/Log in” which is on the right hand side of the page near the top and if you haven’t already register fill in the form with the usual email address, user name etc. Don’t worry you won’t get bombarded with emails from them.

 

 

 

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Having got your registration completed enter your user name and password. Click “Submit”’.

 

 

 

 

 

Click on “imageSearch the GRO Index” on the top of the left hand column.

 

 

 

 

 

Chose Births oimagef Deaths – no marriages, but I am sure they must be working on adding them in very soon.

 

 

Fill in the form as far as you imageknow the details. You have to include Surname, Gender and Year, but the other details can be left blank. You can only search a 5 year time span so if you are undertaking a wide year range search then do remember to note down which years you have checked. Click “Search”.

 

 

 

 

imageThe results are displayed at the of the search page so don’t be fooled into thinking it hasn’t worked, simply tab down the page.

Births can be search from 1837 – 1916 and show the usual name, quarter and year of registration, registration district and volume and page number. Plus now you have the mother’s maiden name which is so helpful in putting families together.

Deaths can be search 1837 – 1957 and show the usual name, quarter and year of registration, registration district and volume and page number. Plus now you have the age at death. Remember that all the details for a death certificate are given by another person and will often depend on what they have been told or think they know. I am sure there are many instances where a guess has been made when stating age !

So do take a look at this site, it is now my go to site for GRO Indexes. If I am unsure of dates I use Ancestry, Find My Past or Free BMD first to narrow down the years. It is so helpful to be able to access mother’s maiden name and age at death. Also from the site you can order a certificate if you wish for £9.50. This is the cheapest way to buy certificates as there is no surcharge like other sites.

Happy Ancestor Hunting Smile