History Videos Online

History Videos Online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>You can‘t really be a genealogist without having an interest if not a passion for history, well that’s what I think anyway! So if you aren’t a history fan then this post isn’t for you, but if you are and you haven’t visited YouTube before then a whole world is about to open up to you.

I’ve been reading Courtiers by Lucy Worsley and wondered what else was available so did a Google on her. That lead me to YouTube and a host of videos by her. Some are only 5 minutes long whilst others are up to an hour. Wonderful programmes about the 17th & 18th century ranging from Peter the Wild Boy to Charles II’s mistresses.

Also I came across videos of lecture given History Videos Online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>at Gresham College on You Tube, but it seems that Gresham has got it’s own website with a back catalogue of their past lectures. Gresham College hosts 140+ lectures a year that are open to the public and it is these that are offered on the website. There is everything from Geometrics to The Black Death. Lots of history lectures that will be of great interest to many family historians and invaluable for background research of the lives and times of our ancestors.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=lucy+worsley

http://www.gresham.ac.uk/

Huguenot Family History

Huguenot Family HistoryI’ve written about the marvellous National Archives Podcast series quite a few times and I make no apologises for mentioning them again. The latest podcast is by renown historian and genealogist Dr Kathy Chater.

From the 1500’s many people fled Europe because of religious persecution, England was often their final destination where they settled and may well feature in your family tree.  These refugees were known as Huguenots, and are represented in the genealogy world by the wonderful Huguenot Society who have published many volumes of records.

This podcast entitled “Tracing Huguenot Ancestors” will assist in finding out if you have Huguenot’s on a branch of your family tree and give much useful information on exploring these interesting ancestors more fully.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/tracing-huguenot-ancestors/

http://www.huguenotsociety.org.uk/

Find My Past tv episodes now online

Find My Past tv episodes now online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>Did you know that the episodes of the FindMyPast tv programmes are available online? I didn’t so I am assuming that some of you also had missed out on this news. The programmes are airing in the UK at the moment, but of course that is no good if you don’t live there or if you have missed an episode.

FindMyPast.co.uk will post on their website a link to each episode one week after it has aired. To view you need to register with FindMyPast and you have 30 days in which to watch the episode before it disappears. However if you are a subscriber to FindMyPast.co.uk then you can watch the episodes from series one and two for an unlimited time.

I watched the Jack the Ripper episode yesterday and whilst it wasn’t big on the genealogy process or the how to it was entertaining and I enjoyed it. I’ll certainly be working my way through the other episodes.

www.findmypast.co.uk

New Podcasts at The National Archives

New Podcasts at The National ArchivesThe Podcast Series on The National Archives website is great for all levels of family historians. The latest additions to the collection are

A real mix of subjects and something to interest everyone.

Below is the link for the Podcast Archive where the complete list of what’s on offer is available.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

 

Coroners’ Inquests

Coroners’ InquestsA recent addition to the wonderful National Archives podcast series is a talk on Coroners’ Inquests by Dr Kathy Chater. Coroners’ Inquests are a real treasure for genealogists if you find one for your ancestors met an untimely end. Of course your ancestor may not have been the subject of the inquest they may have been the coroner, a member of the jury or a witness so if you are searching an index of coroners’ inquests then it is worth while searching under place as well as name. Anything that happened in the village or town where your ancestors lived will be of interest.

You can expect to find the name and address of the deceased, the what, where and when of the death, names of witnesses and details of their evidence, names of the jury and the coroner.

Kathy Chater is well known for her books on genealogy as well as her informative talks on family history.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/coroners-inquests