Manor Park Cemetery Records now complete

Manor Park Cemetery Records now complete<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>DeceasedOnline has announced the completion of the Manor Park Cemetery & Crematorium records. The records span the time period 25th March 1875 to January 2010. Manor Park is unusual in the fact that it has been owned and run by the same family since it establishment in 1875. This cemetery is well cared for and is still in  operation, making it easy for those whose ancestors are buried there.

Annie Chapman one of Jack the Ripper’s victims is buried here along with Winston Churchill’s nanny showing that the cemetery was open for all regardless of social standing.

DeceasedOnline are currently digitising 2.6 million burial and cremation records to add to their database, from 16 burial and cremation authorities around the UK. 1.7 million further records have been digitised from another 18 authorities and are due to be added this year. Plus they are in serious talks with a further 94 authorities about bringing nearly 12 million more records to the website. So lots to look forward to !

http://www.deceasedonline.co.uk/

East Kent parish records now fully searchable

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FindMyPast has had the parish registers for those churches within the Canterbury and Maidstone Archdeaconries’ online for some time, but as browse only. So the announcement that they are now fully indexed will be good news for those with Kent ancestry. The records date back to the start of parish registers in 1538 and span up to the 19th century. The original records for Canterbury are held at the newly re-opened Canterbury Cathedral Archives, whilst the Maidstone registers are held at the History & Library Centre at Maidstone.

http://www.findmypast.co.uk

http://www.kent.gov.uk/leisure_and_culture/kent_history/kent_history__library_centre.aspx

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/conservation/archives/

History of City of York and County of Yorkshire

History of City of York and County of Yorkshire I’ve just come across this website when I was looking for something else …… the internet is great for serendipity isn’t it ?

The History of York website claims that you can explore York’s history from prehistoric to the present day and from what I’ve seen I think the claim is correct.  There are Timelines, Trails, Themes, a What’s New section as well as audio tours. There is a tempting video trailer of the new History of York audio visual spectacular, introduced by Dan Snow, that is now available at the Yorkshire Museum.

The Yorkshire Museum also has a very interesting and informative website, that is well worth spending time on. A quick search on YouTube showed that the York Museums Trust has made a number of YouTube videos that are excellent. I’ve put a link to one below.

York Museum Trust

So if you have ancestors who lived, worked or played in the city of York or the county of Yorkshire here are some resources for you to investigate.

http://www.historyofyork.org.uk/home

http://www.yorkshiremuseum.org.uk/Page/Index.aspx

 

 

Dennis Severs House, 18 Folgate Street, Spitalfields, London

Dennis Severs House, 18 Folgate Street, Spitalfields, LondonI have written before about the house at 18 Folgate Street and on the recent Unlock The Past Cruise I somehow ended up twice talking to people at breakfast about the house and how they must go and see it when they were next in London.

Dennis was an eccentric, there is no two ways about it, but an eccentric with more imagination than most and who has left a wonderful legacy behind him. He decided that he didn’t belong in the 20th century, he died on 29 December 1999 and that he really was most comfortable in the 18th century. It is hard to explain the house and the experience, but yesterday I came across a tv programme on YouTube by Dan Cruickshank  that comes as close as you can to the house without entering it’s door.

If you can go and see it yourself, check the website for opening times and note the restrictions no children, no talking etc. If you can’t then watch the following YouTube programmes, it is in 3 segments.

The House That Wouldn’t Die by Dan Cruickshank

 

Part 1

 

Part 2

 

Part 3

 

http://www.dennissevershouse.co.uk/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Severs’_House

RootsTech Selected Day 1 Sessions now Online

The genealogy news is coming thick and fast today, I just saw on Caroline Pointer post on Google+ that the live streamed sessions that have been on today can now be viewed on the RootsTech website. They have got them up and running so promptly, thank you guys and thank you to Caroline Pointer for letting us know.

Keynote Speech – Dennis Brimhall, Syd Lieberman, Josh Taylor

The Future of Genealogy – Thomas MacEntee and panel

Tell it Again – (Story@Home) – Kim Weitkamp

The Genealogist Gadget Bag – Jill Ball and panel

Finding the Obscure & Elusive Geographic information on the Web – James Tanner

I’ve watched Tell it Again and Genealogist Gadget Bag and thoroughly enjoyed them, now I’m off to watch the rest. Not much being done round here today !

http://www.rootstech.org/