Online Military Library

Online Military Library<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.1   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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Just received a press release from Dominic Hayhoe of Forces War Records about the launch of a their new digital library of historic documents, books, newspapers and magazines, some more than a hundred years old.

Dominic Hayhoe from Forces War Records said “Whilst we’ve been adding records as fast as we can to the main site, we’ve collated a huge amount of books, newspapers and magazines that although they don’t have name records in, are invaluable for research purposes with details about regiments, battles, medals, individual daring escapades and general interest stories.

Some of these magazines alone are almost a hundred Online Military Library<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.1   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>years old and not only did we feel our members would love to read them, but that they were also a national treasure that shouldn’t be lost. Now we have digitised them, they will be available for ever more”.

He went on to say “In addition, as ever, we haven’t just added these to our site, but we have also automatically crossed matched them with all our other data, so if you perform a search for a relative on the site who say served in The Royal Tank Regiment, our system will automatically look to see if we have any articles related to the regiment your ancestor served in as well.”

www.forces-war-records.co.uk

London Poor Law Records

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>Yesterday I wrote about the new Poor Law Records added to the Ancestry London Collection, I promised that I would report back having taken the time to look into them further. So here I am…..

The announcement by Ancestry said that the records now spanned more than 500 years and were everything from Workhouse Admissions to Registers of Servants. I did question why the poor law records would include a register of servants and I still do, but perhaps as I work through these records over the next few days I will find out. if so I’ll let you know!

The first thing to note is that this collection is NOT indexed, you have to browse through them page by page as we used to in the “old days”. We are all so used to having indexes that it comes as a surprise when confronted with a non-indexed set of records. However there are advantages to browsing because you get a feel for the records and how they were kept and there is always the chance that you might pick up something that the indexers didn’t.

So what is in this collection

  • Admission and discharge books of workhouses
  • Registers of individuals in the infirmary
  • Creed registers
  • School registers
  • Registers of children boarded out or sent to various other institutions
  • Registers of apprentices
  • Registers of lunatics
  • Registers of servants
  • Registers of children
  • Registers of relief to wives and children
  • Registers of inmates
  • Registers of indoor poor
  • Registers of deserted children
  • Births & Deaths
  • Baptisms
  • Apprenticeship Papers

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There are also quite a few groups of documents titled Miscellaneous, I would recommend that you  always take a good look at these for the parish or poor law union where your ancestors lived. It’s a bit like a raffle, but you never know what you might find. I think that most genealogists are optimists always hoping that some document or paper still exists that will solve all our family history riddles!!

If you are new to these sorts of records I suggest you visit Peter Higginbotham’s website http://www.workhouses.org.uk/ which gives excellent background information on the poor law system and also has pages regarding individual workhouses.

The London Metropolitan Archives who hold the originals of the documents in this collection has a good guide to the collection which can be downloaded as a PDF file. http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/visiting-the-city/archives-and-city-history/london-metropolitan-archives/Documents/visitor-information/04-poor-law-records-in-london-and-elsewhere.pdf

Almost everyone is going to have an ancestor who has lived in London at some stage in their lives, this collection is a must if you think those individuals may have fallen on hard times whilst there. Take you time, locate which borough or poor law union area your family lived in and then browse and see what you can find.

www.ancestry.co.uk

London Poor Law Records 1430 – 1973

London Poor Law Records 1430   1973Ancestry has just put online an additional 300,000 poor law records for London. This is great news for those of us who have “lost” some ancestors in London ! The blurb from Ancestry says the new collection is everything from registers of servants (why these would be classed as poor law records I can’t imagine!!) to workhouse admission books.

I’m off to see if I can find any of my lost souls …… I’ll report back more fully when I have seen what’s there ….. might be a while!!

www.ancestry.co.uk

Free Cassini Maps

Free Cassini Maps

Cassini Maps are offering a free map to those who live in the UK and who are happy to pay the post & packing charge of £3.49. You can choose which maps you would like and it will be either the Old Series, Revised New Series or the Popular Series. The offer depends on stock availability and is on a first come first served basis, so don’t delay!

To get your free map, simply visit their website.

http://www.cassinimaps.co.uk/shop/freemap.asp

Warwickshire Occupation Records

Warwickshire Occupation RecordsAncestry has been putting a teaser online over the last few days saying that new occupational records are going to be available on the 24th. These records which are now available come from the Quarter Session records held at the Warwickshire County Record Office so say Ancestry, but I am not sure they all do.

However it doesn’t matter if they have got confused as to what comes under quarter sessions (and it may well be me who is wrong!!) they are a very handy set of records. In my option the most valuable of the datasets are the Hearth Tax Returns, Freeholder Lists and the Juror’s Lists. If you are lucky enough to have ancestors in Warwickshire you will certainly be getting value for money out of your Ancestry subscription!!

The records have all been indexed and are also able to be browsed page by page.

  • Boat Owners Records, 1795-1796: Though Warwickshire is a landlocked county in the West Midlands, four major canals run through the area, and shipping by barge has been an important industry. These records list owners of boats.
  • Flax Bounty Records, 1774-1797: Flax was used to produce linen, an industry the government was interested in encouraging because processing, spinning, and weaving flax into linen could create many jobs. To promote linen production, the government offered a bounty to farmers who raised flax. These records are bonds of the flax growers and their sureties to the clerk of the peace that the grower was duly entitled to the bounty.
  • Lists of Freeholders, 1710-1760: These are lists of people entitled to vote, or of people who voted, at elections. A freeholder was a man who owned his land outright or who held it by lease for his lifetime or for the lives of other people named in the lease. This collection is largely 18th century.
  • Lists of Freemasons, 1799-1857: These annual returns of the names and descriptions of the members of Masonic lodges had to be presented to the Quarter Sessions in pursuance of the Unlawful Societies Act of 1799.
  • Hair Powder Certificates, 1795-1797: The practice of powdering hair began in England in the 17th century. At the end of the 18th century a duty of one pound one shilling a year was levied on everyone who continued to use hair powder. Warwickshire Occupation Records
  • Gamekeepers Records, 1744-1888: These records name individuals who were appointed as gamekeepers for specific estates, manors, forests, etc. These individuals may have had other occupations as well.
  • Hearth Tax Returns, 1662-1673: The hearth tax was a tax based on the number of hearths, or fireplaces, in a building.
  • Jurors’ Lists, 1696-1848: These lists of potential jurors can include occupation and street/residence.
  • Printing Press Owners Records, 1799-1866: These records include printers, publishers, and type founders.

www.ancestry.co.uk