Coroners’ Inquests

Coroners’ Inquests<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls1 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

google ad client = pub 2565385867994440; google alternate color = FFFFFF;
google ad width = 468; google ad height = 60; google ad format = 468x60 as;
google ad type = text image;
google ad channel =0092551593; google color border = 336699;
google color link = 0000FF; google color bg = FFFFFF;
google color text = 000000; google color url = 008000;
google ui features = rc:0; //  ></script>
<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>A recent addition to the wonderful National Archives podcast series is a talk on Coroners’ Inquests by Dr Kathy Chater. Coroners’ Inquests are a real treasure for genealogists if you find one for your ancestors met an untimely end. Of course your ancestor may not have been the subject of the inquest they may have been the coroner, a member of the jury or a witness so if you are searching an index of coroners’ inquests then it is worth while searching under place as well as name. Anything that happened in the village or town where your ancestors lived will be of interest.

You can expect to find the name and address of the deceased, the what, where and when of the death, names of witnesses and details of their evidence, names of the jury and the coroner.

Kathy Chater is well known for her books on genealogy as well as her informative talks on family history.

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/coroners-inquests

 

 

 

British Convict transportation registers database 1787-1867

British Convict transportation registers database 1787 1867

Have you got criminals on your family tree? If so then the British Convict Transportation Registers 1787-1867 database will be of interest to you. It has been compiled from the British Home Office (HO) records which are available at all Australian State Libraries.

The database contains over 123 000 of the estimated 160,000 convicts transported to Australia in the 18th and 19th centuries. Details are given such as names, term of years, transport ships and more.

A search for my ancestor John Silcock gave the following information …

  • John Silcock one of 224 convicts transported aboard the Eliza
  • Departed England 2 February 1831
  • Arrived Van Dieman’s Land
  • Convicted at Southampton Special Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years.
  • Free pardon.
  • Original source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/8, Page Number 5

A search of the original records may given further information, but the index alone gives quite a lot of detail.

http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/resources/family-history/info-guides/convicts

New Warwickshire parish transcripts online

New Warwickshire parish transcripts online<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.5   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:20px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

google ad client = pub 2565385867994440; google alternate color = FFFFFF;
google ad width = 468; google ad height = 60; google ad format = 468x60 as;
google ad type = text image;
google ad channel =0092551593; google color border = 336699;
google color link = 0000FF; google color bg = FFFFFF;
google color text = 000000; google color url = 008000;
google ui features = rc:0; //  ></script>
<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>

 

FindMyPast have just announced new additions to their Warwickshire Parish Transcripts Collection. The new records are for the following …

 

 

 

Newbold upon Avon, Rugby

Baptisms    1559-1876
Marriages   1559-1837
Burials        1560-1901

The Rugby Family history Group provided these records.

 

Southam

Marriages   1757-2011
All Saints Leamington Hastings, St Giles Chesterton, Harbury, St Margaret Woolston, St Michael Bishops Itchington, St Mary the Virgin Rudford, Stockton, St John Baptist Stanbridge, Holy Trinity Long Itchington, St Lawrence Napton, St Mary Farleigh, St Alkmund Derby, St Mary Cubbington, St Peter & Paul Cofe Deddington Oxon, All Saints Harbury, St Michael & All Angels Warfield Berks, All Saints Leek Wootton, St John Baptist Clarendon Park Leics, St Peter & Clare Fenny Compton, St Nicholas Kenilworth, St Michael & All Angels Ufton, Romsey Abbey, St John Baptist Blisworth, St Peter Wormleighton, St Mark Winshill, St Mary Tysoe, St John Brandon Co. Durham.

The Southam marriage records are for what is called “away banns”, this means that either the bride or groom was a resident of Southam and the other party came from a different parish.

Burials   1539-2012

The Southam records were provided by Pam Batstone and Mary Williams.

www.findmypast.co.uk

Home Guard records digitised at National Archives

Home Guard records digitised at National Archives

The National Archives have released online a new set of genealogy records, the personnel documents for WW2 Home Guard volunteers for the county of Durham. This section of the defence force became immortalised in the TV programme “Dad’s Army”, anyone of a certain generation will remember Captain Mainwaring and his platoon!! However the digitising of these records have revealed that many of the Home Guard were too young to enlist rather than too old.

The records comprise 40,000+ personnel records and cover the time period 1940 – 1945.  It should be noted that the records of people born less than 100 years ago are closed which means that although you can find them listed on the index you can not download and view them. However if you can prove the person is deceased then there is a specific form to fill in requested access.

 

The record series reference is WO 409 and contains the enrolment forms which were completed by the men as they joined the service. They generally contain

  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Place of Birth
  • Address
  • Date of Enlistment in Home Guard
  • Promotions
  • Previous Military Service
  • Date of leaving Home Guard

It can be seen that this set of records contain very useful family history information which could lead onto military, census, civil registration and other records. It would be wonderful if The National Archives decided to either digitise the records for the whole of the Britain or enter into a partnership with either Ancestry or Find My Past.

If you have family in the county of Durham then this is a document set that is well worth searching, if not then we can only sit and hope that these valuable records are soon online for the rest of Britain. The National Archives, Ancestry and Find My Past often put out surveys about their services and one of the questions is which records you would like to see digitised, now we can ask for Home Guard records and then keep our fingers crossed !

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/durham-home-guard.htm

Image – Wikimedia -photograph H1896 from the IWM collection.

Photographic Collection now online at Families in British India Society website

Photographic Collection now online at Families in British India Society websiteThe Families in British India Society is well known for it’s quality genealogy website focusing on those British ancestors who lived and work in India. The society announced recently that they have been allowed to place online the John Morgan collection of photographs taken in the 19th & 20th century in India.

John Morgan is a collector of material which he then hires out to film & TV as props. Amongst his wide ranging collection are three photograph albums, all labelled and taken in India. What a find! John was kind enough to allow the society to have them reproduced and uploaded onto their website.

The photos are free for everyone to browse through, but exclusive to FIBIS members are two indexes which allows much quicker access to those photos which are of interest. Membership is £15 per year for UK members and a few £’s more for European or Worldwide based members.

This collection is a joy to browse through, the photographs are very evocative of a world that is no more.

http://www.new.fibis.org