New Zealand Emigration & Gold Fields

New Zealand Emigration & Gold Fields

I came across this interesting book on the Find My Past Australasian website, “New Zealand Emigration & Gold Fields” by George Butler Earp, published in 1853 by George Routledge & co. I can just image some of our ancestors being seduced by the lure of gold and snapping up this book when newly printed !

The book covers such subjects as children being an asset in the new colony, over coming a reluctance to emigrate, reports from the various gold diggings and the use of capital in NZ  which would be too small to be of any use in England. When tracing our family trees it is easy to concentrate on adding more and more ancestors and forgetting to get to know the ones that we already have. This book is a good example of background material that adds understanding and colour to our ancestors lives.

Enjoy!

http://www.findmypast.com.au

image – Wikimedia – Gold miner with cart emerging from a NZ gold mine – Auckland Libraries

USA Census Free for limited time

USA Census Free for limited time

Ancestry is offering free access to USA Census records 1790 – 1940 until 3rd September, so set aside some time this weekend to see if any of your ancestors left their homeland to seek their fortunes elsewhere. Bet they did !!!!

http://www.ancestry.com

Version 4 Ancestry App for iPhone, iPad & iPod Touch

Version 4 Ancestry App for iPhone, iPad & iPod TouchAncestry have just released version 4 of the App for iPhone, iPad & iPod Touch.The app is free and is so useful when travelling away from home.

The changes are as follows:-

New Family Tree Viewer
The old viewer showed direct lines only and I thought this was one of it’s major downsides, but the new version has the ability to show grandchildren, siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, a whole range of relations.

Filters
The search bar does the usual second guess of who you are looking for depending on what you start to type in. Plus by tapping “All People” you have access to a variety of filters to help locate the person you are looking for, very useful if you have a large number of ancestors. People with the Shaky Leaf hints can now be listed or just those who have acquired a hint in the last 7 days.

Home Button
If you have wandered up your family tree and forgotten how you got to where you are the home button takes you back to the very start. Again very helpful when dealing with a large tree.

Trees, Settings and Support
I have divided genealogy into four, one Ancestry tree for each of my grandparents. This way I can allow guests access to the part of my family history they are interested in without swamping them with too many ancestors! The new app has a drop down box which allows choosing the tree you wish to view, it has your Ancestry account settings and a facility to email into the support team.

All in all I feel the new app is easier to use and offers more than previous versions, like all change it takes a while to get used to, but is well worth the time spent.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ancestry-com-tree-to-go

 

Unlock the Past Cruise price reduction

Unlock  the Past Cruise price reduction

If you needed a further reason to join me on the 3rd Unlock The Past genealogy Cruise then here it is!!! The price of the cruise has been reduced by $114 – $399 Australian per person. Some grades of cabin have already been sold out so get in quick and take advance of the new pricing.

The cruise leaves Sydney, Australia 10 February and returns 19 February 2013 and has two ports of call. The days at sea will be packed with lectures from a wide variety of speakers including me!! I am talking on “English Parish Registers”, “What to do with the body; A Victorian Solution” and “Researching New Zealand ancestors at a distance”.

Hope to see you there Unlock  the Past Cruise price reduction

http://www.unlockthepast.com.au/events/3rd-unlock-past-history-genealogy-cruise

Are you related to the aristocracy?

Are you related to the aristocracy?

I wish I had a pound for each time I have been told by a beginner in genealogy that they are related to the aristocracy ! Anyone who has undertaken a reasonable amount of research knows that many a family legend turns out to be a myth although they should never be dismissed as often there is a grain of truth in them. Also those more experienced in family history will know that given enough time and access to records we are all related to landed gentry, aristocracy and royalty. It’s just that those links might be rather distant.

A friend of mine has been corresponding with a fellow researcher on her father’s side of the family and when she saw that this person had put a member of the aristocracy onto her online tree she did a relationship search and found that her correspondent was related to this eminent person via the husband of 1st cousin 4x removed of husband of aunt of husband of grand aunt of husband of aunt of wife of 1st cousin of wife of 1st cousin 1x removed !! Think the genetic links are running a bit thin by then !

 

The Peerage

If you think there may be an aristocracy connection there is a good website called The Peerage which lists thousands of entries concerning English & European Peerage and titled families. The information is well researched and is presented in family format. There is also a free iPad app as well as the main website.

http://www.thepeerage.com/

 

Ancestry.co.uk

Ancestry.co.uk has a number of databases that would be helpful. Amongst those on offer are …..

The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland & Wales 1884Are you related to the aristocracy?

Peerage of the British Empire 1848

The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain & the United Kingdom 1910-1916

A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage & Baronetage of the British Empire 1865 Vol. 2 only

Commoners of Great Britain & Ireland enjoying territorial possessions or high official rank: but uninvested with heritable honours 1837-1838

Burke’s Family Records 1897

Burke’s Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England, Ireland & Scotland 1841

www.ancestry.co.uk

 

FindMyPast.co.uk

Find My Past doesn’t seem to have anything to offer in the way of databases especially for the aristocracy.

 

Google Books

Google Books is a favourite amongst family historians, it is always worthwhile running your family names through the search engine to see what turns up. Also if you know a title of a book that you wish to look at then also try the title search. It is surprising what Google Books holds and the holdings will only get better as books and pamphlets houses at The British Library come online.

A quick search using the word Burke’s showed quite a number of hits for books on the Peerage etc.

http://books.google.co.uk/bkshp?hl=en&tab=pp

 

So if you think you might have blue blood running in your veins take a look at these websites.