St Mary Bourne, Hampshire

St Mary Bourne, Hampshire<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.1   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls2 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 1   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>Just come across the fact that St Mary Bourne burials 1756 – 1757, 1780 – 1863 are now online at FamilySearch. Good to see more burials being added to the collection, I have far too many people sitting on my family tree waiting to be buried !

I also found the website of St Mary Bourne church which has a good history of the parish.

 

http://www.stmarybourne.org.uk/

http://www.familysearch.org/

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Northumberland Archives

Northumberland Archives<p><!   Google Ads Injected by Adsense Explosion 1.1.1   ><div class=adsxpls id=adsxpls3 style=padding:7px; display: block; margin left: auto; margin right: auto; text align: center;><!   AdSense Plugin Explosion num: 2   ><script type=text/javascript><!  

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<script type=text/javascript src=http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show ads.js></script></div></p>I’ve just had a look at the website for Northumberland Archives and see that they offer a Personal Mentoring Service, it is a bit pricey at £52 for two hours, but it could be just the thing to get you over a brick wall. There are the usual pages of opening hours, user guides etc. and the catalogue includes part of the collection and is being added to regularly. Of interest is that some of the documents have been scanned and are available online.

http://www.experiencewoodhorn.com/collections/

IGI now on FamilySearch

IGI now on FamilySearchOn the FamilySearch blog there is a posting announcing that the IGI is now available on FamilySearch.

As a long time user of the IGI I knew that there has always been issues with reliability particularly with user submitted entries. The user submitted entries were entries submitted by LDS members from their own research, some of which were flights of fancy and others had a name, an “abt” date and an “abt” place. It has always been a matter of sifting the good from the bad.

The new FamilySearch addressed this problem and used only data from the actual records which had been transcribed twice and then checked for any anomalies so was pretty good.

So the addition of the IGI is interesting, as far as I can see it is to be kept separate and is being split between user submitted entries and extracted entries which will be most helpful.

You really need to read the blog posting yourselves so you can be clear what it is you will be looking at, it’s source and how to access the index. So ……

https://familysearch.org/blog/familysearchupdates-igi/ 

 

Medieval English Towns

Medieval English TownsIf you have established family lines back to the Medieval period then this website will interest you. Working with material as far back as the Middle Ages it is essential to have a good understanding of the social background of the records, the why, where and how of the records you are looking at.

This site states ….

The aim of the Medieval English Towns site is to provide historical information about cities and towns in England during the Middle Ages, with particular but not exclusive emphasis on medieval boroughs of East Anglia and on social, political and constitutional history. A growing selection of primary documents (translated into English) relevant to English urban history is included.

http://users.trytel.com/~tristan/towns/towns.html

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Calendar of Patent Rolls

For most genealogists the big question having read the title of this post is what are Calendar of Patent RollsPatent Rolls? And why not ask the question because they aren’t standard genealogy fare. Here is a description written by National Archives …..

Grants of official positions, or land, or commissions are made by the Crown as letters patent (i.e. open letters) issued under the Great Seal. They are addressed ‘To all to whom these presents shall come’. Copies were and are enrolled (to act as a record) on the Patent Rolls, now in The National Archives, in C 66.

The Patent Rolls run in almost unbroken series from 1201 to the present day (although there are significant gaps for the Civil War and Interregnum period). Latin is the usual language in the early period, but some entries are in English even in the sixteenth century. In the 1650s and after 1733 all entries are in English.

They record a huge variety of documents issued under the Great Seal – treaties, charters, grants of land, offices, titles and pensions, judicial commissions, pardons, patents for inventions, licences, leases of crown lands, presentations to churches, grants of markets and fairs, etc.

I have no idea why the University of Iowa should have these Patent Rolls on their website, but they do and they are freely available for use by researchers and teachers. All they ask is that you acknowledge the source and of course as good genealogists you would do that Calendar of Patent Rolls

http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/patentrolls/

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